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20121006
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 160 (some duplicates have been removed)
temporary. when the government does, it's taking our resources and playing politics with it. it's about trade barrier, stealing our intellectual property rights, what both candidates should be focused on, not this thing about who invests more in china. >> david: if it's private money, may it go where it will. private investors are free to do with their money, but not my money, not my tax dollars. >> i have no allergic relax to governor romney investing in china, if that's what he wants to do. the issue is he makes these investments, goes out on the campaign trail, trashes china, tells us these things he's going to get tough about, when we know he's never going to do any of it. >> david: how do we know any of it, by the way? >> we don't know it, but i'm pretty darn sure. here's the most interesting part, when he finally releases his tax return, we see he quickly sold off the investment he had because he looked guilty. that's kind of silly, isn't it? like the kid getting caught with his hand in the cookie jar. if you feel okay about, don't sell it off because you're running for president.
in advance, will be three on the economy and one each on health care, the role of government and governing, with an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics and choices. both candidates will also have two-minute closing statements. the audience here in the hall is promised to remain silent. no cheers, applause, boos, hisses, among other noisy, distracting things, so we may all concentrate on what the candidates have to say. there is a noise exception right now, though, as we welcome president obama... and governor romney. [cheers and applause] >> reporter: gentlemen, welcome to you both. let's start with the economy. segment one. and let's begin with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about how you would go about creating new jobs. each of you have two minutes to start. a coin toss has determined, mr. president, gufirst. >> thank you very much, jim, for this opportunity. i want to thank governor romney and the university of denver for your hospitality. there are a lot of points i want to make tonight, but the most important one is that 20 years ago, i became t
on domessic policy, including health care, the role of governments, and the number one issue on voters' minds, the economy. you can expect both candidates to have a say on the 8.1% of the unemployment rate and the national debt. keep in mind with early voting under way in 10 states already, many americans have already cast their ballots. still governor romney and presideet obama have plenty of opportunity to hurt or help their campaign in the next nine minutes. no cheering, no. now, the moderator, jim lehrer of pbs. >> good evening from maaness arena at the university of denver in denver colorado. i am jim lehrer of pbs news hour, and i welcome the new to the first of the 2012 presidential debates between president obama, the democratic nominee, and former massachusetts governor, mitt romney, the republican nominee. this debate and the next three, two presidential, one ice- presidential, are sponsored by the commission of presidential debates. tonight's nine minutes will be about he domestic feature and will follow a format designed by the commission. there will be six roughly 15 minute seg
or the candidates. the segments will be three on the economy and one each on health care the role of government, and governing. with an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics, and choices. both candidates will also have two-minute closing statements. the audience here in the hall has promised to remain silent. no cheers applause boos hiss among other noisy distracting things, so we may all concentrate on what the candidates have to say. there is a noise exception right now, though as we welcome president obama and governor romney. [ cheers and applause ] >> jim. >> gentlemen, welcome to you both. let's start the economy segment 1, and let's begin with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about creating new jobs? you have two minutes -- each of you have two minutes to start. a coin toss has been determined mr. president you go first. >> obama: thank you very much for this opportunity. i want to thank governor romney and the university of colorado for your hospitality. 20 years ago i became the luckiest man on earth because michelle obama agreed t
, the role of government, and government, with an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics, and choices. both candidates will also have two-minute closing statements. the audience here in the hall has promised to remain silent. no cheers, applause, boos, hisses, among other noisy distracting things, 0 -- so we may all concentrate on what the candidates have to say. there is a noise exception now, though, as we welcome president obama and governor romney. [cheers and applause] [applause] >> welcome to you both. let's start the economy. let's begin with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about how you would go about creating new jobs? >> thank you very much. i want to thank the university of denver for your hospitality. there are a lo of -- lot of points i want to make. the first point i would like to make, is 20 years ago, i became the luckyest man on earth because michelle obama married me. i just want you to know, next year we will not be celebrating it in front of 40 million people. four years ago we went through the worst financial crisis since the great depr
of four. a growing number of state governments are doing it to get high achieving kids into college sooner. should all states do it to bring taxpayer costs lower? hello, everybody. welcome to "cashin' in." this week we have jonathan, tracy, todd, jim is here, and joining us this week we have sally cohen. welcome to all of you. jim, i'll start with you. why do you like this two-year plan for high school kids? what do you like about it? >> everybody pays taxes, whether they own a home or not, whether they have children or not, everybody pays for education, and every year they get worse education and it costs more. we've dumbed down our school program to rush kids through the system. why not do it the other way? why not had let the achieving kids rush through the system and get away from this burgeoning ed accuracy? beyond that, we're spending money on things that aren't being productive for our economy. let these achieving students, send them the message that if you achieve you will be rewarded. the idea we're going to get any of this taxpayer money back is kind of a mirage. taxpayers never
captioning sponsored by cbs >> i don't think government can solve all our problems but government's not the source of our problems, either. >> i have a plan. i have five steps that will get this economy going. >> i'm not fighting to create democratic jobs or republican jobs, i'm trying to create american jobs. >> i will not raise taxes on middle-income americans. >> the debates will matter to some undecided voters. >> the debates could decide the election for either one of us. >> from denver, colorado, here is scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. we're about to see the one thing we haven't seen in this long campaign for the presidency-- the candidates side by side. it's the first of three debates between the democratic incumbent-- 51-year-old barack obama-- and his republican challenger 65-year-old mitt romney. it comes 34 days before the election-- though early voting is already under way in many states. the focus tonight is domestic issues, including the economy, still struggling to recover from the great recession. polls show the race is very close nationally, but in swing st
. one is make the big picture. he's the free enterpriser and president obama is the big government planner. and those are big differences in philosophy in government. two, romney has a tax cut plan. he has a spending cut plan. he has an energy plan. he's got to make it clear. he's got to explain to people the connection between his plans and the economic recovery that we have not yet had. that's a tall order for romney. and he's going to have to fight hard for it while the, of course is attacking him. >> you said earlier i was watching kudlow and company, you said the first impression is important. he's got to swing right away. you think he'll do that? >> that's my hunch. i've seen this before. aggressive. he's got to put this sort of line in the sand. here's what i believe. and here's what he believes. and there's a big choice in this election. he is the guy who wants redistribution. i'm the guy who wants growth. he's the guy who wants government centered economy. i'm the guy for free enterprise. he's got to say that. but it's doubly hard because he's got to put meat on the bones
, the 80s, this whole egalitarian policy that you got to cut down. the government monopoly incent incentivizes kids stay. let gifted kids move on and save taxpayers money in the process. >> todd, wouldn't you rather have kids, smart enough, willing enough to get out in two years, you would keep programs like gym, home economics, programs they've talked about cutting. this is a way to save those classes perhaps. >> maybe, but you're assuming that you'll have so many kids in this accelerated program. look, it's not a linear number. in other words, you just don't say in two years this is it and they're done. you'll have a big percentage of kids that still have to be there for four years. it's a revolving number. plus, you'll have some that are held back. what do you do with all the kids out of school already? you don't even have the jobs that are there for them already. look, you'll see property taxes go through the roof because the counties will have to hire more people to baby-sit all the kids that you just graduated. >> the thinking is they would go off to college, even if it was
two plans. and by the way, if the government can be as efficient as the private sector and offer premiums that are as low as the private sector, people will be happy to get traditional medicare, or they'll be able to get a private plan. i know my own view is, i'd rather have a private plan. i'd just as soon not having the government telling me what kind of health care i get. i'd rather having a insurance company, if i don't like them, i can get rid of them and get a different insurance company. but people like to make their own choice. and the other thing we have to do for medicare, we have to have the benefits high for those who are low-income, but for high-income people, we're going to have to lower some of the benefits. we have to make sure this plan is there for the long-term. that's the plan i put forward. and by the way, the idea came not even from paul ryan or senator wyden, but it came from bill clinton's chief of staff. this is an idea that's been around a long time. which is saying, hey, let's not see if we can get competition into the medicare world, so that people can
to be put in to a situation where you have a government determining somebody who wants to put the idea up on television can't do that. that's one of the things with the campaign finance is that it's what to nay say about democracy is the worst form of government except for the worst form of government. the campaign finance system may not look perfect. when you look at the alternative i don't know they are god either. i don't know if it's a good to have the department of justice to determine he can't run television ads. ic you should be able to do that. i think it's a first amendment right. when you move to the constitutional right it starts getting ugly. >> yeah. we don't -- even or side there's been money in elections for forever. lots of money. going back as long as with can. we can go back to george washington and the night before. there was tails of flying rum and beer and the voice rang out the day 6 election day. how to they got out of the book. there's been money and things in politics for as long as we know. i don't think either side of a necessarily thinks the money itself and ha
't talk about 600,000 government workers added in the last two months, the largest number since the study's been done since 1948. he didn't talk about what you just talked about, 600,000 temporary. he talked about 7.8 for eight hours today. okay? 7.8. let's talk about how we get the 7.8. this election is too important to let one number that might be corrected next month determine the outcome of the election. >> i'm looking right at the sheet. government -- federal, state and local was only up 10,000. look, i know obama is going to crow about it. any president would crow about he needed some good news after getting walloped and having his clock cleaned at the debate. but my other point, jack -- >> larry, wait a minute, let me make one point. i've been reviewing businesses all week, 14 of them, okay, and not one of them is showing stronger growth in the third quarter than they did in the second. some are equal to the second, some are a little worse than the second. the economy was revised down in the second. it's implausible that you could be running at a 5% gdp growth rate, which is what t
protect its in my pocket. this is the government basically being a moderate. they get to do it legally and there is not all lot you can do to stop them. lori: remind me what tax reform should look like. >> we ought to be taxing consumption instead of productivity. the things that make an economy strong our work, savings, investment. those are things that make us stronger. we penalize the very things that are productive. we ought to be rewarding people are working and saving and investing because they're helping the economy to grow. that is why i am a fairfax -- fair tax supporter which would create a very different model. it is changing the foundation. lori: at the end of the day you need economic growth to be supportive of tax rates, and we are just come as you said, flat line at 1%. a revision, a downward revision. you know, hell are we going to get the overall growth rate higher? do we have to wait? obviously the election is so near, but are we just putting too much hope on to washington right now and not enough on good old fashion innovation and ingenuity? >> ingenuity and in this
the health- care system overnight, but one thing we can do is not rely on the government or the insurance companies. we can make this system more transparent so that you do not have to walk in blind when you choose your health care. if patients are increasingly frustrated with the problems of health care, know that a recent mayo study found that 46 percent of doctors feel they are burnt out. there is frustration on both sides. we have to face an important question now as a society. are we going to believe as a groups that patients have our right to know about the quality of their hospitals? for the first time, this information is being collected. if it brought there for the public more completely, if they could make -- if it was out there for the public more completely, they could make more informed decisions. host: yvonne and maryland accurate -- yvonne in maryland. caller: i have a question for you. i have a family member that is at a local hospital. they went in for a potassium replacement. i thought they would get it in the emergency room and just be there for one or two days. now the
. the president supports the position on the creation of jobs and the government can't do everything but it has a responsibility. we have lost public sector jobs and we have laid off a lot of cops, firefighters and teachers. that is not the way to get the economy humming again. >> governor gilmorgilmore. aka governor romney, what is your solution? >> the economy is another serious problem. that is another way of talking about the plight of real people out there. after four years of stewardship, i can say that we are not moving in the right direction. we are picking up 100,000 jobs a month. you have to have 180,000 just to keep pace. we are not in a recovery. growth is under 2% while it has been 2.2. that is why we are sitting around after all these years. we have a specific plan. that plan are tax incentives in order to build up this economy and great growth. you can't do anything in this country until you get growth going again. until there are plans in place. talking about a tax reduction so that they can spend more money. so that they are xare competiti with over seas people. >> you heard go
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 160 (some duplicates have been removed)